News & Events

School News

2022

  • Flexible Festival at Berkeley Heights

    Students at Berkeley Heights raised a substantial sum of money to donate to Amnesty International at the Flexible Festival. There were vocal, musical and acting performances, visual art and a sale of baked goods for all to enjoy. We were amazed by the range of talent that our students and teachers possess.
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  • Joy in Learning: An Unforgettable Event

    Susana Montague
    FlexSchool’s TEDx event was a great success!

    On Saturday, April 30, 2022, FlexSchool presented a short film, “Joy in Learning,'' alongside other amazing speakers and performers at the JOY 2022: TEDxAsbury Park Conference at the Two River Theater in Red Bank, N.J. The wide proscenium stage, surrounded by a beautiful two-tier, 340-seat theater, provided the perfect setting. 

    The doors opened at 1 p.m. FlexSchool was showcased in the lobby with a tabletop display. As guests arrived, they stopped by the table to mingle and nosh on some Smarties and Nerds candy, and inquire about our school and the community FlexSchool serves. Jacqui Byrne, Founder; Lynne Hendwood, Head of School Cloud; Jen Madsen, Admissions Coordinator, and Susana Montague, Marketing, were on hand to welcome visitors. We would like to express our warm and special thanks to the families that traveled from New York and New Jersey to be part of the day. We are so grateful to you.
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  • A Proud Day for FlexSchool and the Gifted Community

    Lynne Henwood, FlexSchool’s Cloud Campus Head of School, played an instrumental role in achieving an important milestone for the gifted community. This week, Lynne, who serves as president of the New Jersey Association for Gifted Children, accepted a state resolution that designates March as Gifted and Talented Month in New Jersey! “We worked for years to advocate for the needs of gifted learners, and it’s finally coming to fruition,” Lynne says. Congratulations and thank you to Lynne for this significant accomplishment.
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  • Join the Conversation: Black History Month

    The film “Hidden Figures” was created to share the previously untold stories of Katherine G. Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson, who were the brains behind NASA’s launch of astronaut John Glenn into orbit. How well does this modern-day example achieve some of the historic goals of Black History Month – to celebrate the achievements, to recognize the struggles, and to more accurately integrate Black history into its rightful place in American history?
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  • Magical Magnets

    “Superposition is SO COOL!” This comment by a FlexSchool 5th grader was one of many enthusiastic chats, during a lively FlexFriday discussion with graduate student Felicity Hills about the limitations of our knowledge of physics. “Gravity is a good example. We have Newton’s laws and day to day, most of what we interact with can be described with Newton’s Laws. But for really large, black holes, Newton’s laws are no longer sufficient,” Felicity explained. “What we always do in physics is ask questions about things that sort of push on them: Why can’t we explain this? We want to add to the standard model. We do have a set of equations that explain the standard model, but we know those equations aren’t complete because there are things we can’t understand. We want to refine that and make a better theory.”
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  • Join the Conversation: Black History Month

    Google’s “Most Searched” ad is an exuberant tribute “to the history makers and those they inspire.” But how well does this modern-day example achieve some of the historic goals of Black History Month – to celebrate the achievements, to recognize the struggles, and to more accurately integrate Black history into its rightful place in American history? Here are some observations from FlexSchool students:
    • “It doesn’t exactly show the struggles, it makes them aware of the struggles but it doesn’t show all of the struggles. There are a lot of other struggles.” -Bronxville student
    • "I don't think it shows the depth or severity of the problems Black Americans faced; it only shows a happy point, not how they got there." - Cloud student
    • "There isn't any substance; just popular Black Americans. No real expression or meaning or view of everyday Black Americans and what's still happening." - Cloud student
    • "I don't think it shows the growth of Black Americans; it just idealizes famous Black Americans." - Cloud student
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